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Health Administration

A guide to basic information resources in the field of health administration.

Scholarly vs. Popular Articles Video

A video overview of Scholarly vs. Popular Articles from Vanderbilt University. 

Is it Scholarly? Is it Popular?

Scholarly Literature

Scholarly literature is written by researchers who are experts in their fields. They submit articles to journal editors in their field of study, who decide whether or not to publish the articles. 

Some scholarly literature is held to an even higher standard. These are peer-reviewed articles, and they are reviewed by experts in the field, in addition to the editor of the journal, who suggest possible changes to the article before it can be published. 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Examples of Scholarly Literature in Health Administration:

Policy, Politics, and Nursing Practice

Psychological Review

Healthcare Executive

Administration and Policy in Mental Health and Mental Health Services Research

Journal of Health and Human Services Administration

Human Resources for Health

Journal of Healthcare Management

 

 

 

 

Popular Literature

Popular articles are written by journalists, who are employed by the publication for which they write. Journalists cover news, profiles of people, places, or events, and express political opinions. 

 

 

 

Examples of Popular Literature:

The New York Times

Newsweek

Time 

National Geographic

Psychology Today

Science News

 

Thanks to Rutgers University for some of the content of this box. See Popular Literature vs. Scholarly Peer-Reviewed Literature: What's the Difference? for more information. 

Peer Reviewed Articles

Types of Sources

Scholarly Articles Demystified