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Plagiarism

A guide to help students and faculty understand and avoid plagiarism.

Paraphrases

What is a Paraphrase?

"A paraphrase is a detailed restatement in your own words of a written or sometimes spoken source material. Apart from the changes in organization, wording, and sentence structure, the paraphrase should be nearly identical in meaning to the original passage. It should also be near the same length as the original passage and present the details of the original."
University of Houston-Victoria Student Success Center (n.d.).Decide when to Quote, Paraphrase & Summarize.

Paraphrasing is "your own rendition of essential information and ideas expressed by someone else, presented in a new form." 
Purdue University Online Writing Lab. (2012).Quoting, Paraphrasing, and Summarizing

When paraphrasing, you must change both the sentence structure and the language of the original text.

Use It:

  • "When the wording is less important than the meaning of the source"
    University of Houston-Victoria Student Success Center (n.d.) Decide when to Quote, Paraphrase & Summarize.
  • If a summary would not provide enough specific details

How to Cite a Paraphrase:

  • Attribute with an in-text citation some ci;tation styles request that you provide a page or paragragh number whenever available.
  • When paraphrasing, you must change both the sentence structure and language of the original text. Therefore, since you will be changing the text, you do NOT need quotation marks around your paraphrase.
Purdue OWL: Paraphrasing

Includes 6 steps to effective paraphrasing and examples.

Grounds for Argument: How to Paraphrase Fairly 
Includes examples and some step-by-step explanations.

When and How to Paraphrase

Paraphrasing Video